Author: elm15101

Talk: Functional Networks and Speech Production

Vincent Gracco, PhD

Wednesday December 5, 2018 1:30-2:30 PM Arjona 307

Haskins and McGill University

Abstract: A comprehensive understanding of the neural processes for speech production is critical for theory and practice with direct influence on the capability for early identification of typical and atypical development and aging and the development of innovative and optimized treatment regimes. For the most part, the neural processes instantiated in models and theory are incomplete due to an almost exclusive focus on task-induced activation (TIA) and the positive BOLD response (PBR), to the exclusion of task-induced deactivation (TID) and the negative BOLD response (NBR). A related limitation are approaches that fail to fully account for the complex network level interactions that contribute to both sensorimotor and cognitive control for speech. Our recent approach focuses on the identification of functional networks (FN) and the contribution of both activation and deactivation, to gain a comprehensive representation of the neural processes for speech production. The approach is providing insight into brain-behavior relations and in identifying typical and atypical neural organization not easily identified using standard fMRI approaches. The presentation will include recent data on the positive and negative BOLD signal contributions to speech production including an overview of the potential importance of the negative BOLD signal. In addition, neuroimaging data on individuals who stutter will be presented as a model to understand the impact of neurodevelopmental deficits on neural organization.

Bio: Vincent Gracco is currently a Senior Scientist and Vice President of Scientific Operations at Haskins Laboratories. He was a Professor in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University from 1999-2015 and was Director of the Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music, McGill University from 2008-2015. His research focuses on the neuroscience of human communication using multiple neuroimaging modalities and physiological techniques. Current research areas include the neural control of spoken language, sensorimotor dysfunction associated with stuttering and other speech motor disorders, speech motor learning, bilingualism and the relationship between language and music.

Visitors from UCHC are encouraged to use the UCHC-Storrs shuttle service. Talks can also be joined remotely. Please contact us if you are interested in meeting with the speaker.

Talk: Linking Late-Life Depression, Cognitive Impairment, and Dementia

David C. Steffens, M.D., M.H.S.

UCONN Health, Department of Psychiatry

Wednesday, November 7 2018 1:30-2:30PM Arjona 307

Abstract: Depression in late life has been associated with cognitive decline and new onset of dementia. Recent studies have linked the presence of neuroticism with cognitive decline among older depressed adults. Structural Imaging studies in geriatric depression have found that hippocampal volume and burden of white matter hyperintensities are associated with cognitive outcomes. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has recently been used to study late-life depression. Preliminary findings of fMRI in older adults have examined the relationships of neuroticism and depression, identifying the medial prefrontal cortex as a key area in emotion regulation and susceptibility to depression.

Speaker Bio: Dr. Steffens has been funded by the NIH for over twenty-five years. His research focuses on links between late-life depression and subsequent cognitive decline and development of dementia. Assessments include structural and functional brain imaging, neuropsychological testing, blood work for peripheral markers and genetics, personality assessment, functional status, and measures of stress and social support.

Visitors from UCHC are encouraged to use the UCHC-Storrs shuttle service. Talks can also be joined remotely. Please contact us if you are interested in meeting with the speaker.

Talk: Functional MRI Studies of Memory and Navigation

Chantal Stern, D.Phil

Boston University, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Wednesday, September 19 2018 3:30-4:30PM in BOUS A106

Biography:

Stern is an expert in human brain imaging and was a member of the research team that pioneered the development of functional magnetic resonance imaging, including early work focusing on the human hippocampus. Her lab’s primary goal is to study how the normal brain encodes, stores, and subsequently recognizes visual, spatial, and verbal information. In addition to studies of normal memory processes, including long-term and short-term memory processes, Stern and her team are studying basic science questions that include understanding spatial navigation, rule-learning, and interactions between memory and attention. Her translational work focuses on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Thanks to a $1.6 million National Science Foundation instrumentation grant that Stern secured in 2016, her center showcases a Siemens 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanner—a fundamental tool for studying the human brain. (Biography courtesy of www.bu.edu)

Vistors from UCHC are encourage to use the UCHC-Storrs shuttle service. Talks can also be joined remotely. Please contact us if you are interested in meeting with the speaker.

New England Research on Dyslexia Society Meeting October 21

The 3rd meeting of the New England Research on Dyslexia Society will be held in Storrs, CT on October 21, 2017. The meeting will take place on the University of Connecticut campus in Oak Hall.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: John Gabrieli, Ph.D, Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT

“Dyslexia: From Neurophysiology to Intervention”

The New England Research Group on Dyslexia is an interdisciplinary community of researchers, educators, clinicians, and policy experts, whose work aims at elucidating the biological, including psychological, and social underpinnings of Developmental Dyslexia and related disorders with the objective of improving prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment/intervention and social support (including legal, political, and public health) associated with this learning disability.

For more information and to register, visit: http://ibacs.uconn.edu/nerdy/

 

BOLD Brownbag Series

BIRC is pleased to present a series of informal BOLD Brownbag talks, held on Wednesdays from 9-10 AM in Bous 162. If you are not currently on the MRI distribution list, but would like to hear updates about these talks, please join the list serve. This venue is an informal one, geared toward discussion of work in progress (especially methodological/analytical) rather than formal polished presentations of finished products (though we’ll have some of those as well!).

You can find the current schedule here.

BIRC Early Start Grant Program

The Early Start program provides up to 24 hours of scanning time following the submission of an external grant, thus allowing PIs to begin their research while their proposals are under review and, if their proposals are not funded, providing them with pilot data to strengthen resubmissions.   An Early Start award will end when the PI receives notice-of-award of the external grant or one year after approval of the Early Start proposal, whichever comes first. Applications will be accepted at any time.  For more information on the Early Start program, please contact Inge-Marie.Eigsti@uconn.edu.

Seed Grant Proposal Deadline August 28

The next deadline for Seed Grant proposals is August 28, 2017.

The Seed Grant Program is intended for both experienced MRI users seeking pilot data and researchers with little or no MRI experience seeking to establish a track record of MRI research.

More information about Seed Grants is available on the Seed Grants page.